Kwanzaa Culinarians

Recipes and Food Stories from the African Diaspora

Emme Ribeiro of Food Samba Celebrates Umoja

Emme Ribeiro is a chef and blogger based in Seattle, Washington. She began her website, FoodSamba.com, with a mission to inspire people to take their ordinary recipes and turn them … Continue reading

December 26, 2011 · 1 Comment

Umoja: Building a Community of Inspiration

Communities come together for various reasons: a devastating event, to raise money and a call for change. My idea for KwanzaaCulinarians.com honestly started when learning about a popular food show … Continue reading

December 26, 2011 · 2 Comments

Interpreting The Life In Food

Contributor Anthony Beal, is a fiction author turned food writer/blogger, and the creator of Flavorful World food and drink blog. If French cooking’s “mother sauces” and the “three sisters” of … Continue reading

December 25, 2011 · 2 Comments

Milk Not Jails

MILK NOT JAILS is a volunteer-run, grassroots campaign working to build a new urban-rural alliance in New York State. We are urban and rural people, prison justice activists, farmers, artists, … Continue reading

December 24, 2011 · 1 Comment

Finding Support For The Diabetes Community During Kwanzaa

Chrystal Leary is a Los Angeles resident who also maintains the site, Sexy Diabetic. She is an insulin-dependent type two diabetic who has dedicated much of her time to educating … Continue reading

December 23, 2011

What Does the Nguzo Saba Sound Like?

The seven principles of the Nguzo Saba are designed to help us reflect on community building and communal advancement. Unlike its holiday counterparts, Christmas and Hanukkah, there is no canon … Continue reading

December 22, 2011 · 4 Comments

African-American Owned Wine Labels: Brian Duncan’s Bin 36

At Bin 36, the wine flows freely, the staff is friendly and well educated about wine, and the food is deliciously complimented by wine and vice versa.  This all culminates … Continue reading

December 21, 2011 · 6 Comments

Chef Charles Mattocks Dishes Up Holiday Memories

Around the holidays, my Granny would always prepare her most prized recipes for the family. One of my most favorite meals was her Goat and Chicken Curry with Roti and … Continue reading

December 20, 2011 · 1 Comment

The Gourmet Diva Shares a Sweet Potato Story

Confession: Being a Gourmet Diva, I mainly cook with fresh and whole foods these days, so don’t tell anyone I told you this. Would you ever believe there was a … Continue reading

December 19, 2011

Baking With Olive Oil This Kwanzaa

To kick off our last week before Kwanzaa, we wanted to touch base on other ways to bring health and well being into the season. This is a time for … Continue reading

December 19, 2011 · 1 Comment

My Reflections on Ujima by Christa Shelton

Ujima (oo-JEE-mah): Collective work and responsibility: Helping others within the community. As I was reflecting on the principles of Kwanzaa, the one that stands out to me the most is Ujima. While I … Continue reading

December 18, 2011 · 2 Comments

Nutty Banana Bread

Who doesn’t love Banana Bread? It’s one of the quickest breads to make for this season of potlucks and homemade gifts, and it’s delicious when included in Kwanzaa festivities. This … Continue reading

December 17, 2011 · 1 Comment

In Spirit of Kuumba, Shelley Shares her Sweet Potato Bread Pudding

My most fond memories of Kwanzaa is Karamu or the feast. My mother made Kwanzaa a tradition in our house when I was in elementary school. Every year people would … Continue reading

December 16, 2011 · 2 Comments

My First Time Celebrating Kwanzaa. An Umoja Experience.

A foodie colleague told me the other day she didn’t know “what the hell Kwanzaa is.” Admittedly, I was stunned. Not at the fact that this national and cultural holiday … Continue reading

December 15, 2011 · 2 Comments

African-American Owned Wine Labels: André Mack’s Mouton Noir Wines

Written by Janelle Carter of The Cork Chronicles André Hueston Mack, winemaker and owner of Mouton Noir Wines, thinks of himself as something of a black sheep within the wine industry, … Continue reading

December 14, 2011 · 6 Comments

Red Beans and Chicken with Wild Rice

There’s a bean and rice version in every African Diaspora cuisine. Pigeon peas are commonly in Dominican, Haitian and Puerto Rican recipes. Black beans are found in Latin America dishes. … Continue reading

December 13, 2011

Kwanzaa Thoughts from Oldways

. Kwanzaa Culinarians thanks Oldways Program Manager Sarah Dwyer for this contribution. Join our Tweetchat with Oldways and The Duo Dishes on Tuesday, December 20th at 1:00 pm pst/4:00 pm … Continue reading

December 12, 2011 · 2 Comments

Fried Cornmeal Okra

Okra is originally from West Africa, for it was introduced to the American South by the Atlantic Slave trade. Traditional African-American recipes mix okra with tomatoes, lima beans and corn. … Continue reading

December 11, 2011

An Ode to Carver and a Chance to Win a Prize from Peanut Butter and Co.

Written by Therese Nelson is the Founder of Black Culinary History BlackCulinaryHistory.com I have to admit that I have a huge historical crush on George Washington Carver. I love the spirit he … Continue reading

December 10, 2011 · 8 Comments

Jollof Rice, A West African-Inspired Dish

A West African dish, Jollof Rice, or Benachin,  is similar to Latin American’s Arroz Con Pollo, a Spanish Paella, Louisiana’s Jambalaya or Korean Bibimbap. The ground spices, such as cumin, coriander … Continue reading

December 9, 2011

A Gift of Tea for Kids

Many people look at the New Year as a time for reflection; I choose to do this in celebration of Kwanzaa. Time for me to take a look at Spiritual … Continue reading

December 8, 2011 · 3 Comments

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Learn more about Kwanzaa

The word "Kwanzaa" comes from the phrase, "matunda ya kwanza" which means "first-fruits." Kwanzaa's extra "a" evolved as a result of a particular history of the Organization Us. It was clone as an expression of African values in order to inspire the creativity of our children. In the early days of Us, there were seven children who each wanted to represent a letter of Kwanzaa. Since kwanza (first) has only six letters, we added an extra "a" to make it seven, thus creating "Kwanzaa." To learn more about Kwanzaa, visit the Official Kwanzaa Website.