Kwanzaa Culinarians

Recipes and Food Stories from the African Diaspora

Creamy Cheesy Yellow Grits with Roast Brussel Sprouts and Sausage

Thank the Native American tribes located in Southern United States for introducing early American settlers to grits, a common breakfast made from corn. Eventually, descendants of African slaves would turn … Continue reading

December 11, 2012 · 1 Comment

“Potato Mash” is to the Western World as “Foufou” is to West Africans

As a kid, I remember having to learn the meaning of things through association with other similar things. It was a fun way to learn and is actually quite an … Continue reading

December 10, 2012 · 1 Comment

The Principled Baker + Orange Scented Cherry White Chocolate Cookies

Baking is a precise art. It’s about measurements, precise temperatures and timing. If any of these are the slightest bit off, your prize winning recipe can become a disaster. No … Continue reading

December 6, 2012

African Jewel Rooibos Tea Cake

The principle of Ujamaa-Cooperative economics, to build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses and profit from them together, is one that has been ever present in my … Continue reading

December 4, 2012 · 1 Comment

Life and Collard Greens

Life is all about community. If you were touched by something someone said or did for you and you haven’t done it yet… stop. Stop right now and let them … Continue reading

December 3, 2012 · 1 Comment

Understanding Kujichagulia: A Journey Into Self-Awareness

We face neither East nor West; we face Forward. by Kwame Nkrumah Kujichagulia (pron: koo-jee-chah-GOO-lee-ah) is the guiding principle of the second day of Kwanzaa. Defined as self-determination, it affirms … Continue reading

December 2, 2012 · 1 Comment

Creative Giving for the Improving the Community

Celebrating Kwanzaa was not a ritual practiced by my family; in fact, I had no idea what Kwanzaa meant. While obtaining my degree in Africana Studies from NCSU, I learned … Continue reading

December 31, 2011

Imani: Senegalese-Inspired Chicken Peanut Stew

“The black eye pea was introduced into the West Indies from Central Africa in the early 1700s and journeyed from there into the Carolinas. The pea with the small black … Continue reading

December 31, 2011 · 4 Comments

Eva Smith of Tech. Food. Life. Celebrates Kuumba

Kwanzaa is a very important celebration for our heritage. It’s an international non-religious and non-heroic holiday to bring unity into the community. Today’s Kwanzaa principle is  Kuumba (koo-OOM-bah), “Creativity.” Making the … Continue reading

December 31, 2011

Kuumba: Tips for Tastier Food & an Apple and Roasted Beet Salad

It seems creativity is an innate gift of the African diaspora. From hand made jewellery, intricate hairstyles to expressive art, and indeed food, we have been blessed with the talent … Continue reading

December 31, 2011

Ed Sargent of Weekend Food Projects Celebrates Imani

Ed Sargent is the do-it-yourself force behind Weekend Food Projects. His blog is dedicated to food, food issues, and food photography with a strong focus on organic, local ingredients and … Continue reading

December 31, 2011 · 3 Comments

Kwanzaa Kuumba Bear Red and Black Velvet Cake

I feel traditions take stronger root when we are young… Twirling my hair, I envisioned a Kuumba Bear. On a checked cushion of red, black, and green, I dared to … Continue reading

December 31, 2011 · 1 Comment

Imani: Faith and Food

Being of African descent I’ve always been curious about the Kwanzaa holiday. What it means. How it’s celebrated. In researching there are seven principals that represents Kwanzaa. The very last … Continue reading

December 31, 2011 · 1 Comment

Afro-Peruvians: Proud of their Roots

African people were brought to Peru as slaves by the Spanish conquistadors, and little did anyone know how strongly they were going to influence our country through the years. One … Continue reading

December 30, 2011 · 1 Comment

Ujima: Terri Shares Fungee, Cod Fish and Chop Up

When I think about this recipe for fungee, codfish and chop up, I can only think about my mother. This is my favorite dish from our native Antigua in the … Continue reading

December 27, 2011 · 1 Comment

Kujichagulia + Cinnamon Frosted Fig Pecan Scones

The Kwanzaa Principle of Kujichagulia (koo-jee-cha-goo-LEE-yah) refers to self-determination. It speaks to defining ourselves, naming ourselves, creating for ourselves and speaking for ourselves. When I decided to start blogging, I wasn’t … Continue reading

December 27, 2011 · 1 Comment

Chrystal Baker of The Duo Dishes Celebrates Ujima

Chrystal Baker is the co-founder and co-editor of The Duo Dishes. The recipe and events blog has served as a place to share original and adapted recipes with friends, family … Continue reading

December 27, 2011 · 3 Comments

Kujichagulia: Soul Aperture’s Coconut Biscuits

When I was a little girl, the kitchen was my place of solace. It’s the place where my grandmother would set me atop a chair, and teach me all she … Continue reading

December 27, 2011 · 4 Comments

Umoja: Sarina’s Ochro Rice

Umoja/Unity: To strive for a principled and harmonious togetherness in family, community, nation, and world.” What is unity? Is it the sharing of a single purpose, a single outlook? Is … Continue reading

December 26, 2011

Emme Ribeiro of Food Samba Celebrates Umoja

Emme Ribeiro is a chef and blogger based in Seattle, Washington. She began her website, FoodSamba.com, with a mission to inspire people to take their ordinary recipes and turn them … Continue reading

December 26, 2011 · 1 Comment

Umoja: Building a Community of Inspiration

Communities come together for various reasons: a devastating event, to raise money and a call for change. My idea for KwanzaaCulinarians.com honestly started when learning about a popular food show … Continue reading

December 26, 2011 · 2 Comments

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Learn more about Kwanzaa

The word "Kwanzaa" comes from the phrase, "matunda ya kwanza" which means "first-fruits." Kwanzaa's extra "a" evolved as a result of a particular history of the Organization Us. It was clone as an expression of African values in order to inspire the creativity of our children. In the early days of Us, there were seven children who each wanted to represent a letter of Kwanzaa. Since kwanza (first) has only six letters, we added an extra "a" to make it seven, thus creating "Kwanzaa." To learn more about Kwanzaa, visit the Official Kwanzaa Website.