Kwanzaa Culinarians

Recipes and Food Stories from the African Diaspora

The Kids are Alright

If Imani is the belief that a better world can be created for communities now and in the future, I have faith in today’s young adults. Read more and get the recipe for Roast Sweet Potatoes Stuffed with Spiced Couscous and Yogurt.

January 1, 2016

Habari Gani? Celebrate Kwanzaa with Senegalese Chicken Thighs with Red Palm and Coconut Rice by Pierre Thiam

In a Q&A with Pierre’s Thiam of “From Senegal: Modern Senegalese Recipes from the Source to the Bowl,” learn more about Senegal and get the recipe for his Chicken Thighs served with Red Palm and Coconut Rice.

December 31, 2015

Sweet Potato and Mango Spice Cake

By Chrystal Baker of The Duo Dishes and Any and Everywhere. Chef Pierre Thiam’s new cookbook, Senegal, a detailed look into the culture and food of his homeland. The full title, … Continue reading

December 30, 2015 · 1 Comment

Piri Piri Roasted Vegetables

By Chrystal Baker of The Duo Dishes and Any and Everywhere. Ujamaa, cooperative economics, is the topic of the day, and it’s a big one in light of the holiday season. A … Continue reading

December 29, 2015 · 1 Comment

Black Culinary History Year in Review 2015

By Chef Therese Nelson of Black Culinary History. When I thought about what I wanted to contribute to this year’s Kwanzaa Culinarians collection I knew immediately that I wanted to talk … Continue reading

December 28, 2015

On Community, Connection, Balance & Breakfast

By Lisa C. Johnson of Anali’s Next Amendment.  Kwanzaa and its seven principles gives us time to reflect on community. What does it mean to us? Many of us here at Kwanzaa … Continue reading

December 27, 2015 · 1 Comment

New Age Church Punch by Nicole A. Taylor

Story and Recipe By Nicole Taylor of Food Culturist and author of The Up South Cookbook. Punch bowls remind me of togetherness. The gorgeous etched vessels are a symbol of … Continue reading

December 26, 2015

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Learn more about Kwanzaa

The word "Kwanzaa" comes from the phrase, "matunda ya kwanza" which means "first-fruits." Kwanzaa's extra "a" evolved as a result of a particular history of the Organization Us. It was clone as an expression of African values in order to inspire the creativity of our children. In the early days of Us, there were seven children who each wanted to represent a letter of Kwanzaa. Since kwanza (first) has only six letters, we added an extra "a" to make it seven, thus creating "Kwanzaa." To learn more about Kwanzaa, visit the Official Kwanzaa Website.