Kwanzaa Culinarians

Recipes and Food Stories from the African Diaspora

Refresh

I’m thinking too far into a hopeful future. But, that is my faith. Maybe one day or year, Americans will no longer fall for divisive politics. One day, we will pause and look around to see everyone as allies with the same dreams. Celebrate Imani and the new year with a refreshing Lemon Basil Sorbet.

January 1, 2018

Dump Peach Cake

It is our responsibility to use our life experiences to help elevate the lives of others. Regardless of how much of a mess you think your life is, that mess can be used to create something beautiful. Story by Brandi’s Diary | #Nia | #KwanzaaCulinarians

December 30, 2017

Umoja: Feed the Resistance by Julia Turshen

In the spirit of Umoja, Julia Turshen of “Feed the Resistance” shares her Angel Food Bread Pudding with Butterscotch Sauce and talks about volunteering at Angel Food East.

December 26, 2017

Marble Sweet Potato Pie by Christine of “No Gojis No Glory”

When I was asked to join Kwanzaa Culinarians, I knew that this would be a great opportunity to reflect on this past year. Reflection is something that I’m admittedly kinda … Continue reading

December 30, 2014

Peace Through Pie

By Toni Tipton Martin: On Christmas Eve 2011, NPR’s Morning Edition shared a sample of the 2,368 minutes of messages received on the Hidden Kitchens’ listener phone line over the … Continue reading

January 1, 2013 · 2 Comments

Uhma’s Sweet Potato Pie

Modern grandmas are kinda funny to me. Many of them spend endless hours trying to come up with a clever name for the new grandchild to call them. They ask their … Continue reading

December 23, 2012 · 3 Comments

Apple Tart Recipe

December 17, 2012

Celebrating Nia: Past, Present, Future

Nia (Purpose): To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness. Nia. Purpose. I have, for a … Continue reading

December 15, 2012 · 2 Comments

Pineapple Upside Down Hummingbird Cake

From an early age, I was deeply immersed in the culture and celebration of Kwanzaa. I used to perform in a children’s dance company called New Life, which was rooted … Continue reading

December 13, 2012 · 9 Comments

African Jewel Rooibos Tea Cake

The principle of Ujamaa-Cooperative economics, to build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses and profit from them together, is one that has been ever present in my … Continue reading

December 4, 2012 · 1 Comment

Creative Giving for the Improving the Community

Celebrating Kwanzaa was not a ritual practiced by my family; in fact, I had no idea what Kwanzaa meant. While obtaining my degree in Africana Studies from NCSU, I learned … Continue reading

December 31, 2011

Kwanzaa Kuumba Bear Red and Black Velvet Cake

I feel traditions take stronger root when we are young… Twirling my hair, I envisioned a Kuumba Bear. On a checked cushion of red, black, and green, I dared to … Continue reading

December 31, 2011 · 1 Comment

Nutty Banana Bread

Who doesn’t love Banana Bread? It’s one of the quickest breads to make for this season of potlucks and homemade gifts, and it’s delicious when included in Kwanzaa festivities. This … Continue reading

December 17, 2011 · 1 Comment

In Spirit of Kuumba, Shelley Shares her Sweet Potato Bread Pudding

My most fond memories of Kwanzaa is Karamu or the feast. My mother made Kwanzaa a tradition in our house when I was in elementary school. Every year people would … Continue reading

December 16, 2011 · 2 Comments

My First Kwanzaa

Written by Walker Tisdale III of HealthyBlackMen.org, the Number One Source for Healthy Black Men I recall my very first Kwanzaa celebration and ironically it was as an undergraduate student … Continue reading

December 2, 2011

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Learn more about Kwanzaa

The word "Kwanzaa" comes from the phrase, "matunda ya kwanza" which means "first-fruits." Kwanzaa's extra "a" evolved as a result of a particular history of the Organization Us. It was clone as an expression of African values in order to inspire the creativity of our children. In the early days of Us, there were seven children who each wanted to represent a letter of Kwanzaa. Since kwanza (first) has only six letters, we added an extra "a" to make it seven, thus creating "Kwanzaa." To learn more about Kwanzaa, visit the Official Kwanzaa Website.