Kwanzaa Culinarians

Recipes and Food Stories from the African Diaspora

The Kids are Alright

If Imani is the belief that a better world can be created for communities now and in the future, I have faith in today’s young adults. Read more and get the recipe for Roast Sweet Potatoes Stuffed with Spiced Couscous and Yogurt.

January 1, 2016

Sweet Potato and Mango Spice Cake

By Chrystal Baker of The Duo Dishes and Any and Everywhere. Chef Pierre Thiam’s new cookbook, Senegal, a detailed look into the culture and food of his homeland. The full title, … Continue reading

December 30, 2015 · 1 Comment

Roasted Sweet Potato and Swiss Chard Salad

With so many great winter vegetables up for grab, it’s easy to keep salads interesting. This one features cubes of roasted sweet potatoes and shredded swiss chard, which is not … Continue reading

December 24, 2014

Kuumba-Inspired Roasted Sweet Potato Cake

As I begin to explore the principles of Kwanzaa as an inspiration for a recipe, I was most inspired by the principle of Kuumba. There are a few different translations, … Continue reading

December 22, 2012 · 6 Comments

Sweet Potato, Caramelized Shallots, Smoked Mozzarella Pizza with Wilted Arugula

It was the Senegambians who were brought in to grow cotton, tobacco, rice and other grains and corn. They were also expert fishermen, blacksmiths, woodworkers and hunters. Having a legendary … Continue reading

December 12, 2012

The Gourmet Diva Shares a Sweet Potato Story

Confession: Being a Gourmet Diva, I mainly cook with fresh and whole foods these days, so don’t tell anyone I told you this. Would you ever believe there was a … Continue reading

December 19, 2011

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Learn more about Kwanzaa

The word "Kwanzaa" comes from the phrase, "matunda ya kwanza" which means "first-fruits." Kwanzaa's extra "a" evolved as a result of a particular history of the Organization Us. It was clone as an expression of African values in order to inspire the creativity of our children. In the early days of Us, there were seven children who each wanted to represent a letter of Kwanzaa. Since kwanza (first) has only six letters, we added an extra "a" to make it seven, thus creating "Kwanzaa." To learn more about Kwanzaa, visit the Official Kwanzaa Website.